Rules Committee Takes On Iran Nuclear Agreement

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Following a month-long recess in August, members of the House Committee on Rules gathered to discuss the terms of debate on the politically polarizing Iran Nuclear Deal.

The committee established there will be 11 hours of debate split between the Foreign Affairs, Oversight and Government Reform, Judiciary, Ways and Means and Financial Services Committees over the course of the next three days.

Chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, Ed Royce, introduced the disapproval resolution, which the House is expected to pass Sept. 11, with the goal of preventing the Obama administration from implementing the nuclear agreement.

Republicans have strongly opposed the president’s negotiations with China, Britain, Germany, France, Iran and Russia on the deal.

According to Royce, who has led over 30 hearings on the topic, if the deal is passed, the influx of money seen in Iran due to the lifted sanctions will end up in the hands of anti-American extremist groups.

Rules Committee Chairman Pete Sessions said passing the resolution would provide “the best chance to stop the bill in its tracks.”

A Gallup poll released in August shows just one in three Americans approves of the way the president has handled the deal.

“In the last few months, however, it became clear that the Administration was interested in cutting, I think, any good deal with Iranians,” Sessions said. “Because the administration negotiated from a position of weakness, it ended up with a deal that gives Iran everything it wants and leaves the American people wondering what we got in return.”

Democratic Rep. Jim McGovern disagreed with his conservative counterparts, saying that while he doesn’t trust Iran, he believes it is the best chance the country has to prevent the Middle Eastern country from gaining access to a nuclear weapon in the near future.

The Obama administration released a statement Tuesday saying it will reject the House’s current version of the bill.

“The President has made it clear that he will veto any legislation that prevents the successful implementation of the JCPOA,” the Office of Management and Budget said.

Senate Democrats have secured the 41 votes needed to uphold the president’s veto in the upper chamber.

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